Saturday, October 24, 2015

Is Jordan Switching Sides?

Is Jordan Switching Sides?

by Stephen Lendman

On Friday, Sputnik News, RT International, the Jordan Times and Reuters said Russian and Jordanian officials agreed to establish a “special working mechanism” to share information on counterterrorism operations in Syria. 

“Under an agreement between His Majesty King Abdullah II and Russia’s President Vladimir Putin, the militaries of the two countries have agreed to coordinate their actions, including military aircraft missions over the Syrian territory,” Sergey Lavrov explained. He urged other nations to join their coalition against a common enemy.

Jordan’s communications minister Mohammad Momani said “military cooperation…between (both countries) concerns southern Syria and aims to ensure security of the Kingdom's northern frontier.”

“Jordan remains an active member of the international coalition fighting the Da'esh terror group.” Coordination between both countries isn’t new, he added. It’s been developing for some time at all levels.

Reuters said “Moscow’s deal with Jordan could mark a shift in the alliances engaged in the Syria conflict.” Jordan’s ambassador to Moscow Aiad al-Majali said establishing a “special working mechanism” to share information on Syrian operations increases military cooperation between both countries to an unprecedented level.

“It will not be just in a format of informations exchange,” he explained. “(W)e see a necessity ‘to be on the ground’ as Jordan has a border with Syria.”

“(W)hen it comes to combating terrorism, we have to” increase Amman/Moscow cooperation. Discussions have been ongoing for some time. How this affects US regional operations remains to be seen.

Jordan is a longtime US ally, an Israeli one since their October 1994 peace treaty, both countries at the time pledging neither would let its territory be used as a staging ground for military attacks by a third country, a promise broken practically before the ink was dry.

Washington works with both countries to advance its imperium, freely using their territory. Is Jordan now shifting alliances?

It lets CIA and Pentagon operatives along with British and French instructors train ISIS fighters covertly at a secret military location, sending them across its porous 375 km border with Syria to fight Assad’s government.

Jordan’s apparent willingness to join Russia’s campaign likely reflects concern about extremist elements biting the hand that’s been feeding them.

Their ambitions go way beyond Syria and Iraq. They may have Jordan and Lebanon in mind next with other countries to follow if they’re not stopped.

Putin’s main concern is their presence in Afghanistan, likely intending to expand to Central Asia, especially Russia.

Russian intelligence estimates around 3,500 militants in Afghanistan, their numbers increasing - US, UK, Arab and Pakistani instructors training them.

Russia’s Main Intelligence Directorate chief Col. Gen. Igor Sergun said ISIS elements see Afghanistan as a rich recruiting ground, a foothold for expanding into Central Asia - why Putin believes it’s urgent to defeat them in their current strongholds. 

Does Jordan now share the same view? Another body blow to Washington’s hegemonic agenda if so.

Stephen Lendman lives in Chicago. He can be reached at lendmanstephen@sbcglobal.net. 

His new book as editor and contributor is titled "Flashpoint in Ukraine: US Drive for Hegemony Risks WW III."

http://www.claritypress.com/LendmanIII.html

Visit his blog site at sjlendman.blogspot.com. 

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