Friday, May 13, 2016

Dire Economic Conditions in Brazil Made Rousseff Vulnerable

Dire Economic Conditions in Brazil Made Rousseff Vulnerable

by Stephen Lendman

US-supported right-wing extremists voted overwhelmingly to impeach her without just cause, a parliamentary coup by any standard.

A Senate trial will likely convict her, removing her from office despite no legitimate grounds, replacing social democracy with neoliberal harshness - the process already begun.

Addressing the nation on Thursday, Rousseff called for popular support, “mobilized (to) defend democracy” against dark forces wanting it ended.

“I am ready to resist through all legal means,” she said. Brazil’s Supreme Court denied her 11th hour appeal to intervene responsibly.

Vice President Michel Temer replaced her as interim president - a right-wing extremist, former and likely current CIA asset. Social movement leaders pledged resistance against extremist dark forces.

Russia blamed “foreign interference.” Brazil is an important BRICS member. Its Development Bank threatens US dollar hegemony as the world’s reserve currency.

Dire economic conditions and corruption scandals not touching her directly lost her popular support.

Brazil is Latin America’s largest economy, the world’s eighth largest - now mired in its worst recession in over half a century, hard hit by low oil and other commodity prices, a slowing global economy, high inflation and millions unemployed.

Monied interests opposed Rousseff’s Bolsa Familia program, addressing deep poverty, benefitting millions of Brazilians most in need, helping them through education, healthcare and direct cash transfers.

It’s now threatened. Right-wing extremists taking over intend neoliberal harshness, likely abandoning social justice altogether.

Interim President Temer faces corruption charges. He’s barred from seeking elective office for eight years over electoral violations. 

Straightaway he sacked Rousseff’s cabinet, replaced it with 22 right-wing members, nine fewer than under Rousseff, all white business-friendly men, diversity excluded, no women, the first time a Brazilian government excluded them since the 1970s.

Former central banker Henrique Meirelles is new finance minister. He’ll oversee neoliberal harshness. Jose Serra was appointed foreign minister. He’ll support Washington’s imperial agenda. 

Romero Juca was named planning and development minister. Known police state harshness advocate Alexandre de Moraes is new justice minister. 

“Soybean king” agribusiness billionaire Blairo Maggi was appointed agriculture minister.

Former army general Sergio Westphalen Etchegoyen was named institutional security minister. Education went to Mendonca Filho with a mandate to dismantle Rousseff’s progressive changes.

Health minister Ricardo Barros has no background in medicine. His portfolio is coveted because its budget exceeds all other ministries.

Harder than ever hard times await most Brazilians. Temer and likeminded extremists intend serving monied interests exclusively.

Most upper and lower members of parliament face corruption charges. So do six or more of Temer’s ministers. “Trust me,” he ludicrously said in his inaugural address. Polls show he has a scant 2% popular support.

Rousseff’s chance to avoid impeachment is slim. “I may have committed mistakes, but I never committed crimes,” she asserted.

She’s not charged with any. She calls witch hunt proceedings against her “the most brutal thing that can happen to a human being” - condemnation without justice.

Stephen Lendman lives in Chicago. He can be reached at lendmanstephen@sbcglobal.net. 

His new book as editor and contributor is titled "Flashpoint in Ukraine: US Drive for Hegemony Risks WW III."

http://www.claritypress.com/LendmanIII.html

Visit his blog site at sjlendman.blogspot.com. 


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