Thursday, June 30, 2016

Kerry Suggests Maybe No Brexit

Kerry Suggests Maybe No Brexit

by Stephen Lendman

Addressing the right-wing Aspen Institute on Wednesday, Kerry said Brexit “(d)idn’t change a thing.”

“This is a very complicated divorce.” David Cameron is loathe to invoke Lisbon Treaty Article 50, legally required to begin a lengthy Brexit process. He feels “powerless” to negotiate what he doesn’t want.

“(A)nd I think this is a fair conclusion - to go out and start negotiating a thing that he doesn’t believe in and has no idea how he would do it.”

“(N)or do most of the people who voted for it,” Kerry referring to Leave campaigners like former London mayor Boris Johnson, the frontrunner to replace Cameron until announcing he's pulling out, perhaps pressured by Remain interests.

Asked how Brexit could be “walked back,” Kerry said “I think there are a number of ways.” He declined to enumerate, stopping short of explaining the popular vote was non-binding. 

Parliament alone has final say up or down. Most MPs will support what powerful interests want. Clearly they oppose Brexit, making it highly unlikely.

Did Kerry inadvertently explain what’s ahead, despite leaders like Germany’s Angela Merkel saying “(t)he referendum is a reality…I can see no way that this can be reversed…”

She along with other EU leaders met in Brussels, Cameron included in day one discussions, not day two, creating the impression (or perhaps illusion) of a new 27-nation bloc without Britain.

Talks focused on “curb(ing) a rising tide of populism driven in large part by hostility toward Brussels,” according to The New York Times - talking tough, hardening their position, European Council President Donald Tusk saying there can be “no single market a la carte.”

“Those wanting access to our single market” must play by its rules, obeying its “four freedoms,” including movement of capital, people, goods and services.

French President Francois Hollande warned London no longer would be able to clear euro-denominated trades, important for its financial industry.

Consensus was no talks with Britain until it invokes Article 50. Some there want the referendum ignored. Parliament can simply vote it down, said prominent lawyer Geoffrey Robertson.

“Our democracy does not allow, much less require, decision-making by referendum. Democracy has never meant the tyranny of the simple majority, much less the tyranny of the mob.”

According to Robertson and others like him, rule by privileged few alone matters, not popular sentiment. Important decisions shouldn’t be left to ordinary people.

EU leaders, together with Washington’s dominating influence, will chart a course to prevent Brexit. A consensus statement was deceptive posturing, saying it “creates a new situation for the European Union…many people express(ing) dissatisfaction with the current state of affairs.”

They “expect us to do better when it comes to providing security, jobs and growth, as well as hope for a better future.”

They’ll chart it like always, serving special interests exclusively. Western democracy serves the privileged few alone, not the popular will.

Stephen Lendman lives in Chicago. He can be reached at 

His new book as editor and contributor is titled "Flashpoint in Ukraine: US Drive for Hegemony Risks WW III."

Visit his blog site at 

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